Wooden PC Case in the making - Got Questions.

Discussion in 'Modding' started by killem2, Jan 5, 2010.

  1. Psi*

    Psi* Tech Monkey

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    Jun 17, 2009
    Westport, CT
    Sharp chisels are your friend :)
     
  2. Tharic-Nar

    Tharic-Nar Senior Editor Staff Member Moderator

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    Nov 25, 2009
    UK
    Indeed. The sharper the better. It is worth the time to invest in learning how to sharpen chisels/tools as well, preferably with a progressive set of finer whetstone's. Only use a grinder to get rid of any dents or chips, you can't use them for final sharpening and honing the edge. With something like pine, it should be like carving butter with a knife, if you have to push too hard, then your either taking too much off in one go - or it isn't sharp enough.

    And don't get cheap chisels... trying to use unhardened mild steel as a chisel is just asking for trouble... A lot cheap chisels are just surface hardened and or low carbon steel, meaning they work for about 5 mins, then when you sharpen them and grind away the surface layer, you might as well use a spoon...

    But all this kind of goes without saying...
     
  3. madstork91

    madstork91 The One, The Only...

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    Feb 24, 2005
    TEXAS!
    I personally have quite the collection of chisels. I like carving ;)

    It depends on the shape of the hinge for the shape of the chisel you want to use at times. Be sure to buy a rubber mallet or hammer for chips, unless you want to slide, but that takes some practice to do exact.

    I suggest (if you are going to use a chisel) to use a chisel to indent the line around your hinge and then come in softly to that line from the edge of the wood. Be sure not to indent too deep... this can be tricky if it is your first time... get some scrap pine and practice with chisel or two if you think you might need to.

    There is an attachment for a dremel these days that acts like a router of sorts. Its not bad, but it too takes some time to get used to, imo anyways...
     
  4. Tech-Daddy

    Tech-Daddy Tech Monkey

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    Apr 7, 2005
    Plano, Texas USA
    What an amazing thread! I am learning a TON about wood working!
    Cant waitto see the progress on this build!

    I, myself, have never worked with wood as a primary build mechanism, I've only built rudimentary jigs for bending acrylic around and such. So, I'll be watching with great interest to see how this progresses and will offer up any input I can *if* it is helpful.

    Best of luck, and the only thing I can offer up right now is "speed kills" and "be patient!"

    -=TD
     
  5. killem2

    killem2 Coastermaker

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    Jan 5, 2010
    Oh also :)
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Got muh fans in today !
     
  6. killem2

    killem2 Coastermaker

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    Jan 5, 2010
    What would you suggest for the fan holes i tried a new jig saw i just bought on a practice piece and the blade tilts just slightly and the holes looks stupid.

    Is there anything more precise?
     
  7. Psi*

    Psi* Tech Monkey

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    Jun 17, 2009
    Westport, CT
    Not sure what you mean the tilted blade on the jig saw ... trying to picture in head, but it is not developing.:confused:

    Anyway, check out a saber saw. Some come with a compass attachment ... just listen to Danny
     
  8. Tharic-Nar

    Tharic-Nar Senior Editor Staff Member Moderator

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    Nov 25, 2009
    UK
    If the blade is tilting, there are a number of reasons....
    One, the jigsaw 'jig'/guide isn't straight (some can lean up to 45 degree), make sure it is properly 0'd out.
    Second, your not pushing down firmly enough and the saw is bouncing up and down causing the blade to wobble around.
    Third, your using the wrong type of blade - the harder the material, the more teeth per inch you'll need, as using a standard wood blade on MDF will cause the blade to wobble since the teeth are too big and it'll try to cut too much material in one go.

    Using a jigsaw is not exactly easy to begin with, since you need a strong grip and steady hand. You won't get a perfect circle with one, but they can do good curves. If your going to be making several holes, then you could make a single template/jig and then use a Router.

    Of course, you can get large circle cutter bits for drills.... they like to wobble a bit and take a bit of time to cut through something and are bessed used with a drill press.... like the following....
    http://www.woodcraft.com/Family/2000799/Circle-Cutters.aspx
     
  9. killem2

    killem2 Coastermaker

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    Jan 5, 2010
    Is a router a table top tool? My father in law has this huge thing in his garage that has a swivel based thing that can cut wood in addition to his table saw (which I know what that is)
     
  10. Tharic-Nar

    Tharic-Nar Senior Editor Staff Member Moderator

    1,119
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    Nov 25, 2009
    UK
    A Router (woodworking kind - not the networking kind), is either a hand-held or table top - High speed (30k rpm), small bit, cutting tool, think of a dremel on steroids. The bits come in many shapes and sizes, so it can do decorative finishes, grooves, curves, etc. They're usually used in conjunction with guides and jigs, since they are very hard to control free-hand. Typically, you fit a small guide wheel above the Bit, press the Router down against the surface your cutting (with guides set), start it up and then push the guide wheel against the jig. The bench kind are used extensively for making decorative coving, Dado rails and skirting boards.
     
  11. killem2

    killem2 Coastermaker

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    Jan 5, 2010
    Ok that's awesome, so the bench tool is what I'm thinking of? I looked ok google images and this is what I saw that looks like what my father in law has:

    This probably isn't the exact same, but i know this is generally what it looks like.

    [​IMG]

    So this will work, its just kinda over kill for simple circles I assume.
     
  12. Psi*

    Psi* Tech Monkey

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    Jun 17, 2009
    Westport, CT
    looks like a planer
     
  13. killem2

    killem2 Coastermaker

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    Jan 5, 2010
  14. Tharic-Nar

    Tharic-Nar Senior Editor Staff Member Moderator

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    Nov 25, 2009
    UK
    That looks like a CNC miller... can see the outline of the word CNC on the left side (though that could be a model reference). CNC (Computer Numerically Controlled) mill is a bit different from a router. They are automated milling machines that can use Router bits. You program in a cutting pattern, material, dimensions, etc, press start, and it'll cut out what you programmed in with the tool that's inserted. The bench top moves around as it cuts away (hence the rails on the side).
     
  15. killem2

    killem2 Coastermaker

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    Jan 5, 2010
    Yeah that's not what he has, after talking with a friend up stairs, its similar to that, but its no computerized so you have to sit the board down lock your bit in place and move the wood.


    I think over all I'm going to go for a circle cutter in a drill press.
     
  16. Psi*

    Psi* Tech Monkey

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    Jun 17, 2009
    Westport, CT
    ZMD-1318 now that is a serious router
     
  17. Psi*

    Psi* Tech Monkey

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    Jun 17, 2009
    Westport, CT
    If you don't ask father in-law about this, even in the most in direct way, he will be insulted.

    I am sort of kidding, but sort of not also.
     
  18. killem2

    killem2 Coastermaker

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    Jan 5, 2010
    Ask and you shall receive :)

    I started it last night. Here is what it looks like so far :)

    Its still a ways off, lots of filling, and sanding left before staining.

    The Back
    [​IMG]

    Inside
    [​IMG]

    Front (its on its side right now)
    [​IMG]

    Look from the top inside.
    [​IMG]

    From insides looking out the back.
    [​IMG]

    1st 140mm exhaust fan
    [​IMG]

    And the 2nd
    [​IMG]

    The front with the 200mm fan :)
    [​IMG]

    cd rom
    [​IMG]

    power button
    [​IMG]

    Where the hard drives attach and the usb panel
    [​IMG]

    Front view with top board laying in place.

    [​IMG]

    Same as above except the back
    [​IMG]

    No hinges yet but this is how I will access the case.
    [​IMG]
     
  19. madstork91

    madstork91 The One, The Only...

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    Feb 24, 2005
    TEXAS!
    Not bad man!

    Now that im looking at it I would suggest getting some stereo speaker grills to use over the fans on the intake (just for aestetics) Especially if you could bronze them out against a stain. Just an idea.

    The holes are pretty good for your first time really doing this (which from reading the thread this is something you are relatively new at) So dont be shy about it! I know some framers who cut worse holes!

    Be sure to rubber it up though... I am not kidding about that being a problem a few months down the line. Wood likes vibration.

    Prep, stain, seal, post pics!
    Good luck!
     
  20. killem2

    killem2 Coastermaker

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    Jan 5, 2010
    Are these rubber pieces you are talking about are they the size of the fan like you would think of in a car engine that goes between cover the block? Or are you talking about just some rubber seals that go over the screws?
     

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