HAF mod Start

Tech-Daddy

Tech Monkey
Due to contaminants in one of my loops, I wrecked a set of tubing (had this hazy, tan/brown crapola all on the inside of the tubes.
THANKFULLY, I had purchased extra! ;)

If you have your components, and you can mount them in the case temporarily, grab some string and approximate your tube needs using the string to go between your water ports.

Your end length is a minimu of what you will need, add on a foot or two for bad cuts, and then double it if you want spare to use in the event of an emergency.

:)
 

Kougar

Techgage Staff
Staff member
Due to contaminants in one of my loops, I wrecked a set of tubing (had this hazy, tan/brown crapola all on the inside of the tubes.
THANKFULLY, I had purchased extra! ;)

Yeah, that happened with my first loop. I used Swiftech's green liquid additive and some of it broke down in the loop, ended up dying the tubes a nasty yellow-brown and left a scum line on everything else in only a few months.

That is why I use pond/pool additives now. Much cheaper, they do not break down after 6 months time, and they don't react with other pool additives like algaecide/anti-bacterial solutions. My loops are still a pretty crystal clear blue even though it's been running about a year now. Found some red pool dye to try the next time I rebuild the loop... I might try making purple by mixing the two but that'll probably not come out right... :D
 
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Merlin

The Tech Wizard
For sure, ten feet worked out great with some to spare.
I ran a 1/2" red loop for the CPU and a 3/8" blue loop for the GPU
I kind of started at one point, estamated the length by sight and then went to the next point of connection.
just to get the loop complete for a 24 hours leak test.
 

Merlin

The Tech Wizard
2 loops

Had to mod the res up top in the 3/8", I could not get it inside the case, so I used the two holes cut for watercooling on the back of the case. It seems to all be about the most efficient way of running tubbing, no kinks, no restrictions, better flow rate for carrying the heat in water.
I did get some algecide, clear and safe for the tubbing.
But, the little res up top is also a fillport and it's easy to get the bubbles out of the system.
 

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b1lk1

Tech Monkey
All I can say is make sure you watch that res for leaks. I woke up this morning and hit my power button and my hard drives clicked so loudly I was sure one had dies out of the blue. As I was pulling them out I noticed they were both wet!!! My res was located over the hard drive cage and one of those cheapass shit plastic barbs that Swiftech uses was loose and leaked coolant all over my drives. After an hour with a blow drier and another 3 hours on the window sill I managed to get them both working again (who said Seagates are not tough!). I went to the hardware store and got myself a T-line and I am gonna smash that f***ing res to pieces with a really big hammer later.

PS: I will never use another Swiftech product that contains plastic barbs in my water loop.
 
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Merlin

The Tech Wizard
All I can say is make sure you watch that res for leaks. I woke up this morning and hit my power button and my hard drives clicked so loudly I was sure one had dies out of the blue. As I was pulling them out I noticed they were both wet!!! My res was located over the hard drive cage and one of those cheapass shit plastic barbs that Swiftech uses was loose and leaked coolant all over my drives. After an hour with a blow drier and another 3 hours on the window sill I managed to get them both working again (who said Seagates are not tough!). I went to the hardware store and got myself a T-line and I am gonna smash that f***ing res to pieces with a really big hammer later.

PS: I will never use another Swiftech product that contains plastic barbs in my water loop.
I'm using a small Swiftech Res outside the case on the top, the other drive bay res is a DD with metal barbs.
The only leak I had a problem with was the single 120 RAD for the GPU loop. I had to use two O-rings to get it to seal on the 1/4 threaded metal barb, I guess I should really go back and seal that one with silicone just to make sure
 

b1lk1

Tech Monkey
Good idea. I thought this stupid res was sealed until it leaked. I have to admit I hastily added another 120MM rad to the bottom of my case and I probably am responsible for loosening the barb, but I hate those damn plastic barbs because they are so easy to strip. On the plus side I bought a back of zip ties with the T-line stuff and used almost 100 of them cleaning up the wiring inside my case, lol.
 

Kougar

Techgage Staff
Staff member
Yes, those plastic swiftech barbs can cause issues. They have to be torqued in more tightly than it first appears. I caught one of mine with an extremely slow leak on my Apogee GT CPU block during leak testing, and only after 24 hours was it showing ANY signs of a leak.

I've been looking around at the various chrome plated barbs since then, some of the high-flow models look to be worthwhile upgrades even if they are all rather pricey.
 

b1lk1

Tech Monkey
I put some chrome metal barbs on my Apogee. I just didn't have any more for the res. I never wanted the res anyways so now I have the t-line I prefer.
 

Merlin

The Tech Wizard
I put some chrome metal barbs on my Apogee. I just didn't have any more for the res. I never wanted the res anyways so now I have the t-line I prefer.
:)
I kind of like to see the flow in a RES, a good flow lets me know it's working, plus, if the waterline starts to lower, then I need to see where the water is going.
On the DD 5.25 bay res, I have two red LED imbedded in the back to bring out the color without using dyes in the water
 

b1lk1

Tech Monkey
The main reason I do not like them is they are prone to leakage. With a T-line, you can visually tack the water level as well. It is truly down to personal preference, but my preference is to keep the chances of leaks down to the absolute minimum. On that 5.25bay reservoir, in the long run keep an eye out for cracking which is very common in those. The Swiftech reservoir mostly suffers from junk fittings and don't crack as easily.
 

Kougar

Techgage Staff
Staff member
Technically chances of leaks are in favor of a T-line, simply because instead of a inlet and an outlet port a T-line has an additional third coupling, therefore a third point of leakage.

I just use a reservoir because I like to check on the flow rate, and not have to top off my loop every month. Also while its probably not needed, it gives the water in the loop some expansion room as the water can get pretty hot when I push the envelope or the room AC is left off.
 

b1lk1

Tech Monkey
Technically no, you are wrong. Reservoirs are made of plastic. They are all well known and documented to crack. Some crack faster than others. They have barbed fittings that are plastic and easy to crack. Their holes can be easily stripped as well. You have infinitely more of a chance of a leaky reservoir than a T-line. My t-line is a brass T. I used clamps on all 3 lines. There are no barbs to loosen and leak. The fill line is also capped with a brass plug. Once clamped it is almost impossible to develope a leak.

There is plenty room in a T-Line for expansion as well. I do not run the A/C where my PC is and I run it overclocked as far as possible 24/7.

Using a reservoir is a personal choice but it is FAR riskier than using a T-line.

PS: How exactly do you fill your reservoir? That seems like a 3rd point for leakage as well.
 

Kougar

Techgage Staff
Staff member
PS: How exactly do you fill your reservoir? That seems like a 3rd point for leakage as well.

Yeah, it would be. Same as the cap on a T-line.

Reservoirs should only crack if they are cheaply made or the barbs are screwed in too far, but yes they can be an additional source of risk. I can't figure how but some person poked a hole in his DD single bay Res cap and it leaked on him. He was using packaging tape to seal it. :rolleyes:
 
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